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  • Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

    Old 05-06-2011, 11:30 AM
      #15381  
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    Nancy and Kwendt -
    You gals are awesome! Thanks so much for your fun enthusiasm -- makes me even more excited about my two new gals... I can HARDLY wait to get belts for them, and get sewing!! The 15 is cleaned and ready to go - will get more pics in soon. The other one I have to finish cleaning and restoring the cabinet, then I will get the machine cleaned and ready to go - hopefully today!
    Anyway, thanks so much for your help, information, and encouragement!! You are totally wonderful!
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    Old 05-06-2011, 11:47 AM
      #15382  
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    I think it's so much fun navigating the fun site with all the questions about the machine. At some point, I'll answer them all correctly and it'll tell me that I own a 66, in the meantime, I am getting a great education on the different parts of the different model machines.

    A quick question about maintenance. It wasn't until the last year that I started oiling my regular machine. I took it in for her oil change every year and apart from brushing out gunk periodically, she sat without me having to do anything from maintenance to maintenance. I was telling one of my quilting buddies this once and I was in concern for her health as her face turned bright red and her eyeballs went all cockeyed. She absolutely insisted I was
    "killing" my machine. Of course, my machine didn't have a name or gender then, she was just a machine. SO... she showed me the odd spot back behind the bobbin casing I needed to put one drop of oil every or every other bobbin change and brush frequently. Ok...I brush out the lint at every bobbin change, but I'm probably oiling at every 3rd or 4th. I'm still not noticing a big difference.

    So...fast forward to the vintage machine. I have 2 full pages in my owners manual with 24 odd places of interest for oil. REALLY!?!?! I have to oil this every 4 hours? How am I supposed to keep track of the hours? So, I went to my singer guy and asked. He insists that she doesn't need anything except once a year. What do you all do?

    I don't want to break or otherwise hurt the machine or her production by either oiling/cleaning too much or too little or in the wrong places. There's more arrows on my manual than Carter has liver pills. I just have no idea what I should be doing with her.

    Any help is appreciated.
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    Old 05-06-2011, 11:49 AM
      #15383  
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    Originally Posted by kwendt
    Originally Posted by Crossstitcher
    Farmstitcher, I have a reg. 306 machine and it takes the 206X13 needle which you can still find. This machine will also use a double needle. Full vision bobbin case,calibrated tension for accurate adjustment,reversible feed,calibrated stitch regulator,smooth seamless throat plates,positive feed for handling all types of fabrics,oneway needle clamp makes it almost impossible to place needle in clamp incorrectly,takes the fashion discs for making decorative stitches.
    Wow... that's a cool machine. The discs it takes are the flat ones? or the 'top hat' looking ones? Just curious.
    It takes the flat cams. I love my 306. I don't sew on it much anymore, but if I had to chose an electric, it would be a 15-91 for straight stitching and a 306 for decorative and ZZ. (Maybe I'd use the 201 for sewing clothes!!!!)
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    Old 05-06-2011, 11:51 AM
      #15384  
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    Originally Posted by HanNatNana
    I've just been given a collection of old wooden reels of Sylko (cotton) sewing thread, of course the thread is old and brittle and not good for sewing but I'll use them to display with my old machines!!

    Does anyone else collect other sewing items? Some years ago I was given an old, hand embroidered pin cushion that came with some 'handmade' pins, then I have an antique stitching sampler which takes pride of place in my home and has done for many years. It's in a lovely, understated walnut frame which cost a fortune because the sampler wasn't a regular frame size. The lady who gave it to me was then (30 yrs ago) in her 80's and it was stitched by her great, grandmother as a 6yo in 1844. It's the grab-and-run item in my fire plan which hopefully never has to be implemented.

    Bronwyn
    I have several different style needle cases and thread cabinets, and even a DMC floss cabinet. Name it, I've probably got one somewhere.
    Incorrigible.
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    Old 05-06-2011, 11:54 AM
      #15385  
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    The model 15 has an ocillating shuttle; the 115 is full rotary.

    Originally Posted by BoJangles
    Originally Posted by sewnserge
    Hi Nancy -
    Wow!! You sound so excited! Thanks!!! :wink: Yes it is a Model 15, and the lever is a back tack. Do you have any suggestion for how to lower the feed dogs?? I was hoping I could use it for FMQ, because it has such a long arm...10-1/4"! It has cleaned up fairly well -- it has been ridden hard--has multiple dings and nicks, and tons of scratches where they put their pins in a strap of fabric they wrapped around the arm. There was a decal, but only a tiny bit is visible -- I can see the S from the Singer decal on the arm, and there is a little bit of decorative scrolling on the upright--but it is mostly gone.
    I am excited! Your machine appears to have the Tiffany decals which were common on the Model 115's. That is why it appears to be a Model 115, but it is a Model 15. I did some research and Singer started making Model 15's in 1895 and continued to make them until 1957! The Model 115's were made from 1912 to 1935 from what I can find - they are really similar - I am not sure what the difference was in those two machine early on?

    Anyway, there should be thumb screw under the bed when you tip the machine up that will drop the feed dogs for FM quilting if in fact the very early ones had that capability! I have a Model 15-88 treadle that does drop its feed dogs with that thumb screw on the under side of the bed right next to the bobbin hook race.

    Nancy
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    Old 05-06-2011, 11:57 AM
      #15386  
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    Anyone know anything about a 1950 Eldredge. Didn't know they were even made. Saw one in a cabinet for $30, that looked brand new. Had that rough dull finish.
    Attached Thumbnails attachment-193777.jpe   attachment-193778.jpe  
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    Old 05-06-2011, 11:58 AM
      #15387  
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    Originally Posted by Miz Johnny
    Originally Posted by HanNatNana
    I've just been given a collection of old wooden reels of Sylko (cotton) sewing thread, of course the thread is old and brittle and not good for sewing but I'll use them to display with my old machines!!

    Does anyone else collect other sewing items? Some years ago I was given an old, hand embroidered pin cushion that came with some 'handmade' pins, then I have an antique stitching sampler which takes pride of place in my home and has done for many years. It's in a lovely, understated walnut frame which cost a fortune because the sampler wasn't a regular frame size. The lady who gave it to me was then (30 yrs ago) in her 80's and it was stitched by her great, grandmother as a 6yo in 1844. It's the grab-and-run item in my fire plan which hopefully never has to be implemented.

    Bronwyn
    I have several different style needle cases and thread cabinets, and even a DMC floss cabinet. Name it, I've probably got one somewhere.
    Incorrigible.
    I bought 2 of the DMC floss cabinets on CraigsList. Have one by each machine. The one by my 403 has the sewing machine feet, bobbins & cams for it, and all my various threads for piecing. The one by my 15-91 has the sewing machine feet & bobbins for it, and all my various threads for quilting. Turned out to be a great set up.
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    Old 05-06-2011, 12:09 PM
      #15388  
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    This is probably a no brainer, but did you try raising the needlebar to the highest point before putting the bobbin case in?
    Hold the bobbin by the latch, put it in place over the stud, then push back until it sort of "snaps" into place.

    I agree that this is the biggest negative with the 306/319. They are so big and heavy, and have to be tipped back in order to insert the bobbin. It's a PITA and in general a bad design. But they sew so well!!


    Originally Posted by Weedwoman
    Been trying to use my 306k and at this point, if I could lift it, I'd throw it out a window. I can't seem to get the bobbin case to 'snap' into the place where it's supposed to. That is one thing I really hate about this machine is how difficult it is to access the bobbin. Who the hell came up with the idea that we'd just love to man handle that heavy head to put a new bobbin in? I'm sure I have the right size bobbin because I've sewn with this machine before. Isn't it and L bobbin? any help is greatly appreciated because Carmen (it's name) is on thin ice right now.......
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    Old 05-06-2011, 12:14 PM
      #15389  
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    Don't worry about every 4 hours, but do oil your vintage machine frequently during periods of heavy us. Metal on metal is NOT a happy sound!

    As for your modern machine, it depends on what it is. For instance, Vikings have a sealed system and are not meant to be oiled.


    Originally Posted by mpeters1200
    I think it's so much fun navigating the fun site with all the questions about the machine. At some point, I'll answer them all correctly and it'll tell me that I own a 66, in the meantime, I am getting a great education on the different parts of the different model machines.

    A quick question about maintenance. It wasn't until the last year that I started oiling my regular machine. I took it in for her oil change every year and apart from brushing out gunk periodically, she sat without me having to do anything from maintenance to maintenance. I was telling one of my quilting buddies this once and I was in concern for her health as her face turned bright red and her eyeballs went all cockeyed. She absolutely insisted I was
    "killing" my machine. Of course, my machine didn't have a name or gender then, she was just a machine. SO... she showed me the odd spot back behind the bobbin casing I needed to put one drop of oil every or every other bobbin change and brush frequently. Ok...I brush out the lint at every bobbin change, but I'm probably oiling at every 3rd or 4th. I'm still not noticing a big difference.

    So...fast forward to the vintage machine. I have 2 full pages in my owners manual with 24 odd places of interest for oil. REALLY!?!?! I have to oil this every 4 hours? How am I supposed to keep track of the hours? So, I went to my singer guy and asked. He insists that she doesn't need anything except once a year. What do you all do?

    I don't want to break or otherwise hurt the machine or her production by either oiling/cleaning too much or too little or in the wrong places. There's more arrows on my manual than Carter has liver pills. I just have no idea what I should be doing with her.

    Any help is appreciated.
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    Old 05-06-2011, 12:16 PM
      #15390  
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    Hi Billy and everyone! I have just purchased a rather in need of work 99 singer 1924. She is missing cord and foot pedal. Is is hard to locate those and are they reasonable? I got the sewing machine for 11.50 plus shipping. She needs a new belt too.

    Thanks for any replys... of where to find etc :)

    Sharon
    Attached Thumbnails attachment-193771.jpe   attachment-193772.jpe   attachment-193773.jpe   attachment-193786.jpe  
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