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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #39301
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Nancy, I believe it is a brass bushing that was impregnated with oil. If I remember right it was called an oilite bushing or bearing. Even though it technically was a bushing, they called it a bearing. I never figured that one out. But don't quote me on that. I have a Kenmore with these in it and the manual says right on the cover NOT to oil the machine. HA! It was seized up but good! I oiled the heck out of it and now it is free. ~G~
    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    Ok before we go any further with the Viking 'Self Oiling" feature, I was just informed by Cathy, Mizkaki, that the Viking 'Self-Oiling" thing was not infact an oil, but a 'bearing' they used filled with oil? Cathy is going to do some research on this subject for us! I love learning!

    Nancy

  2. #39302
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    Nancy, I believe it is a brass bushing that was impregnated with oil. If I remember right it was called an oilite bushing or bearing. Even though it technically was a bushing, they called it a bearing. I never figured that one out. But don't quote me on that. I have a Kenmore with these in it and the manual says right on the cover NOT to oil the machine. HA! It was seized up but good! I oiled the heck out of it and now it is free. ~G~
    I'll bet it's a Kenmore 120-491 isn't it? I got one too and it was also seized up. Tri-Flow to the rescue.

    Joe

  3. #39303
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Nice looking machine but needles and drive wheel are hard to find. Name:  Ken.120.1.jpg
Views: 2208
Size:  803.6 KB Kemore Model 71. Same machine I think but the 71 has the stitch control down on the bed. ~G~
    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    I'll bet it's a Kenmore 120-491 isn't it? I got one too and it was also seized up. Tri-Flow to the rescue.

    Joe

  4. #39304
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Needles: Use DCx1F serger needles and seat them a bit shallow. Align them so the needles eye matches the position of the original needles.

    Drive wheel: Depending on the motor shaft size you might can still get them.
    { http://sewing-machine-parts-store.co...&brand=&page=2 }
    { http://www.shop.sew-classic.com/Moto...-Parts_c21.htm }
    { http://thayerrags.com/ }

    If they don't have it, with a little bit of ingenuity and ambition, you can make your own rubber part.

    Joe

  5. #39305
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Thanks Joe! I actually did get a little creative on this one. Thank heavens there was an old needle in there that I could tell was different than a regular needle. I had no real luck searching on line for an answer either. It is not the most discussed machine out there. I did see one for sale and emailed the owner with the question of needles that he had for his machine. He was very nice and most helpful and understanding. He told me that the needles he had were 206X13 needles. I called my local shop and they had some. I bought some and put them in the machine. The Scarf was not cut out of them and it hit a little but it sewed. I am convinced that those needles are ALMOST correct for this machine if only they had the scarf cutout in them.
    Now as to the drive wheel. It is a direct drive machine that the handwheel rolls away from you in a CLOCKWISE direction. That is opposite most machines and hard for this old dog to get used to. This particular machine has a drive wheel that has a bobbin winder post on it too! How strange is that? For this reason it is impossible to find new. I did not find one anywhere. The machine has no provisions other than this drivewheel to wind a bobbin. It sat for 4 months until I saw some automotive fuel line in my junk drawer. I cut a piece to length and cut the old dried, flatspotted rubber off of it and fitted it over the shoulder of the shank and it worked! WARNING! This is not an easy task! I think I made up a few new words getting it into position, but it can be done! Name:  Ken.drive.wheel.jpg
Views: 447
Size:  165.9 KB This is the finished product.
    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Needles: Use DCx1F serger needles and seat them a bit shallow. Align them so the needles eye matches the position of the original needles.

    Drive wheel: Depending on the motor shaft size you might can still get them.
    { http://sewing-machine-parts-store.co...&brand=&page=2 }
    { http://www.shop.sew-classic.com/Moto...-Parts_c21.htm }
    { http://thayerrags.com/ }

    If they don't have it, with a little bit of ingenuity and ambition, you can make your own rubber part.

    Joe

  6. #39306
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Ah, yours is different than mine. Mine is a 120-491, I should have looked closer at your pic. It has a different drive wheel than mine. Mine actually has a bobbin winder on it.


    What size hose did you use to make your rubber tire with?

    If your owners manual calls for a Kenmore 49 needle like mine does here is a trick to make setting the DCx1F easier. Take a strip of magnet tape and cut out a tiny spacer. Put the spacer in the needle hole and push it up with the needle. Being a magnet it will stay there and you can switch out needles easily.

    Joe

  7. #39307
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    Nancy,
    I hope that this information helps. Starting in about 1972 Husqvarna machines were advertised to be "self oiling". They did this by putting sintered bearings in their machines. These bearing were oil impregnated. The idea was the heat generated by the shaft turning in the bearing would draw oil up from the pores of sintered steel bushings/ bearings and bring it to the surface. The reality was that many machines sit, unused. Viking learned that these machines would dry up & get stuck from non-use. And if someone did oil these bearings with WD40 or the likes they probably sealed the pores in the sintered bearings, and they would no longer will absorb or dispense lubrication possibly ruining the machine.

    On another note, by now the OLD sintered bearings need some help. They probably have no oil left in them and Husqvarna did not provide any outside route to get oil in (i.e. oil holes). So oil with penetrating abilities is needed i.e. Tri-flow. If these bearing have become dry then it is even harder to lube them. A gentle application of heat from a hair dryer works well to open the pores of the bearing so that Tri-flow will be drawn in.

    There is no product that Viking used that caused these or other machines to seize, it was and continues to be the sintered bearings.

    Cathy


    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    Ok before we go any further with the Viking 'Self Oiling" feature, I was just informed by Cathy, Mizkaki, that the Viking 'Self-Oiling" thing was not infact an oil, but a 'bearing' they used filled with oil? Cathy is going to do some research on this subject for us! I love learning!
    Nancy
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  8. #39308
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    Joe,

    I believe that the other designations for these short needles are 'CC', '38Y1', '40F1', and 'Free Rotary'.
    They are still available in limited sizes and quantities from the sewing machine wholesale/ supply houses.
    If you want some let me know and I'll put them on my next order with Brewer.

    Cathy
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  9. #39309
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Joe, it is a 7.9 mm Inside Diameter fuel line. Name:  fuel.tubing.jpg
Views: 399
Size:  149.2 KB ~Grant~

  10. #39310
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mizkaki View Post
    Nancy,
    I hope that this information helps. Starting in about 1972 Husqvarna machines were advertised to be "self oiling". They did this by putting sintered bearings in their machines. These bearing were oil impregnated. The idea was the heat generated by the shaft turning in the bearing would draw oil up from the pores of sintered steel bushings/ bearings and bring it to the surface. The reality was that many machines sit, unused. Viking learned that these machines would dry up & get stuck from non-use. And if someone did oil these bearings with WD40 or the likes they probably sealed the pores in the sintered bearings, and they would no longer will absorb or dispense lubrication possibly ruining the machine.

    On another note, by now the OLD sintered bearings need some help. They probably have no oil left in them and Husqvarna did not provide any outside route to get oil in (i.e. oil holes). So oil with penetrating abilities is needed i.e. Tri-flow. If these bearing have become dry then it is even harder to lube them. A gentle application of heat from a hair dryer works well to open the pores of the bearing so that Tri-flow will be drawn in.

    There is no product that Viking used that caused these or other machines to seize, it was and continues to be the sintered bearings.

    Cathy
    Cathy, thank you for clearing up the Viking "self oiling" feature! I have one vintage Viking that, according to the original owner, is a late 1960's machine. Other than what I have read about the bad name Viking got for their 'self-oiling' feature that ruined a lot of machines - I know nothing about Vikings! I was told there were service repair people that used the same technique when they got machines in for repair - now I highly doubt that was true? It sounds like the 'bearing' was something unique with the self-oiling machines? I was also told that the self-oiling hardened and gummed up a lot of machines. I think that statement could be somewhat true due to the oil hardening from non-use? Your thoughts? I have stayed away from vintage Vikings because of the little I 'thought' I knew.

    Nancy

  11. #39311
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    Nancy,
    You got it. If there are other brands that use the sintered bearing/ bushings they also rely on regular usage to keep the oil flowing.
    BTW There are other 'self oiling' systems. I had a beautiful green Remington from the 50s that had a built in oil 'tank'. To keep it oiled you needed to push on the top on the tank occasionally and oil was delivered to all areas via tiny copper tubes that ran through the interior of the machine. Cool idea, except it was messy as oil leaked.

    Cathy
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  12. #39312
    Super Member craftiladi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    Joe, I had the same problem with my 401. Make sure that the needle is in correctly. I reinserted the needle the wrong way three times in a row and mine was doing the same thing. I had the needle hole 45 degrees off. If that is not it check to make sure that the thread is going between the upper tension disks and not next to them. (I've done that too) And make sure that the tension disks are clean. There should be three disks. ~G~
    I have done that and then hit myself up the side of my head...lol its a duh moment. I acquired a singer 758 and I am having problems getting the bobbin to wind evenly..waiting on new bobbins and will try a new needle but I can see a good size nick on the plate...wish I knew the story behind that.
    Dee Lowe
    Las Vegas Nv.

  13. #39313
    Super Member craftiladi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mizkaki View Post
    Nancy,
    You got it. If there are other brands that use the sintered bearing/ bushings they also rely on regular usage to keep the oil flowing.
    BTW There are other 'self oiling' systems. I had a beautiful green Remington from the 50s that had a built in oil 'tank'. To keep it oiled you needed to push on the top on the tank occasionally and oil was delivered to all areas via tiny copper tubes that ran through the interior of the machine. Cool idea, except it was messy as oil leaked.

    Cathy
    Cathy as I reading your post I was thinking " Oh I would like a self oiler" then I read where it got messy...so many emotions to go through in a second. lol
    Dee Lowe
    Las Vegas Nv.

  14. #39314
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mizkaki View Post
    Joe,

    I believe that the other designations for these short needles are 'CC', '38Y1', '40F1', and 'Free Rotary'.
    They are still available in limited sizes and quantities from the sewing machine wholesale/ supply houses.
    If you want some let me know and I'll put them on my next order with Brewer.

    Cathy
    Cathy,
    I'll have to make a note of these numbers. The only other number besides the Kenmore 49 that I'd come up with is the Boye 2.

    Are the needles you're talking about flat shank or round shank, and do you have a pic of them? I'm curious as to what the point to the eye looks like.

    Joe

  15. #39315
    Senior Member almond's Avatar
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    White machine

    I was antique shopping in Savannah Georgia yesterday and found this White machine. The fly wheel still turns but does not move the needle up and down. They want $38.00 for it. If anyone is close and interested it can be found at 37th and Abercorn Antiques. 301 East 37th St. in Savannah. Here are pictures. Sorry Can't get pictures to download. Will try again in another posting to see if I can get it to work.
    Mary

  16. #39316
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    Joe, it is a 7.9 mm Inside Diameter fuel line. Name:  fuel.tubing.jpg
Views: 399
Size:  149.2 KB ~Grant~
    Grant,

    Lets see, what's that in American ...... 3/8" I think. I used a piece of 3/8" hose to "try" and make one, but I couldn't get the hose over the shoulder of the shaft. What did you use to do that?

    Joe

  17. #39317
    Senior Member almond's Avatar
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    Pictures

    Sorry, will not let me download pictures this morning. Just keep getting upload failed.
    Mary

  18. #39318
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    Joe,

    I'll take a picture tonight after work. I'll place a CC, 206x13, and15x1 in the pix. The CC, if I remember correctly is a flat shank with a normal point. I looks like the 15x1 but the timing length (top of shank to top of eye) is shorter.

    cathy



    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Cathy,
    I'll have to make a note of these numbers. The only other number besides the Kenmore 49 that I'd come up with is the Boye 2.

    Are the needles you're talking about flat shank or round shank, and do you have a pic of them? I'm curious as to what the point to the eye looks like.

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  19. #39319
    Super Member Surfergirl's Avatar
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    My son found a Singer sewing machine model #81-2 and we can't locate much info on it. Do any of you know anything about this machine? Any info would be much appreciated.
    Lynn

  20. #39320
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Joe, I am not sure but luckily the hose I used had those marked on it. I just checked and it seems like it is a 5/16" fuel line hose. The important part is that it is 7.9 mm Inside Diameter.
    It was not easy and was tricky and frustrating. I cut the replacement hose to size first. I put the hose on the bobbin winding post and pried from the opposite end with a small screwdriver enough to get the hose over the shoulder. I pushed the hose down using a pair of pliers enough to get it started. I took another small screwdriver and ran it between the hose and shoulder kind of like how they mount tires on a car rim while maintaining pressure on the hose with a socket from a socket set flipped up side down so the opening is down and away from the hose so the bobbin shaft could poke through it as the hose slid down. Once the hose was over the shoulder I used the pliers to work it down into position. This is all after I had removed the old rubber and cleaned up the surface of the shaft where the old rubber was. It did not need any adhesives as the rubber was good and tight on it.Name:  fuelhose.jpg
Views: 202
Size:  64.5 KB I hope this helps. Good luck! ~G~


    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Grant,

    Lets see, what's that in American ...... 3/8" I think. I used a piece of 3/8" hose to "try" and make one, but I couldn't get the hose over the shoulder of the shaft. What did you use to do that?

    Joe

  21. #39321
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfergirl View Post
    My son found a Singer sewing machine model #81-2 and we can't locate much info on it. Do any of you know anything about this machine? Any info would be much appreciated.
    Lynn, can you post a photo? That is a interesting machine. It is an Industrial, which Singer stopped making in 1954. It is an "over-edge 3 thread chain stitch" machine that stitched at 4500 spm. It was made to use on flannel, denim, etc. It uses an 81x1 needle.

    Nancy

  22. #39322
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Cool. Brute force. Who says you can't do the guy thing on sewing machines . I'll check my supply of fuel hose and see if one is marked 7.9 mm. By the thickness of the hose walls I'm thinking it's fuel injection hose.

    Joe

  23. #39323
    Super Member Surfergirl's Avatar
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    Nancy, my son is bringing the machine to me next week...will post a pic then. Thanks for the info.
    Lynn

  24. #39324
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    Joe and Grant,

    I have in the past resurrected a worn out motor pulley. I moved the pulley over along it's shaft until it's edge would make contact with the handwheel. I then ran the motor at a fast clip and 'gouged' a deep groove in the old pulley's middle with a rough file. The depth of this 'gouge' was the same as the inside diameter of a bobbinwinder tire or o-ring. Slip the tire or o-ring over the pulley and realign it to the handwheel. Works perfectly. Clear as mud?????

    Cathy
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  25. #39325
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    Lynn,

    I have an 81-12. Mine was for carpet binding. The thing weighs a bloody ton! As Nancy said it takes a 81x1 needle.

    Cathy



    Quote Originally Posted by Surfergirl View Post
    My son found a Singer sewing machine model #81-2 and we can't locate much info on it. Do any of you know anything about this machine? Any info would be much appreciated.
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

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