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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #12726
    Senior Member olebat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwendt

    Hi olebat.... if someone hasn't mentioned it. Billy has a tutorial on how to clean these old gals. He uses kerosene and the cleaner GoJo the NON-PUMICE kind. His tutorial is really good. There's one on dismantling and one on cleaning....
    Thanks, I've seen the cabinet and guts cleaning, didn't recall the machine exterior. I'll have to wait a spell. I've hauled it in the house now. Will have to take it back outside if I use the kerosene. We're in the height of pine pollen season. The yellow dust clouds bellow everywhere. Just walking across the porch leaves footprints like walking on fresh snow. The pine pollen is large molecule, and even feels gritty. Wouldn't want that to become an abrasive. LOL

  2. #12727
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    I just posted a new tut on cleaning and reviving antique furniture(sewing cabinets) in the tutrorial section if you are interested. It is an alternative to refinishing. If we ask Billy nicely maybe we can get him to move it to VSMS for us. Glenn

  3. #12728
    Senior Member emmah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn
    I just posted a new tut on cleaning and reviving antique furniture(sewing cabinets) in the tutrorial section if you are interested. It is an alternative to refinishing. If we ask Billy nicely maybe we can get him to move it to VSMS for us. Glenn
    I really appreciate the help you and others give us quilters as we make these old machines live again. Thank you very much.

  4. #12729
    Senior Member Happy Treadler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitzone
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmouse
    LOL, I meant is my machine too young?

    ya'll have infected me! (sorry about the accent, lived in Tx 6 yrs) :mrgreen: ya'll is just such a good word! hee!

    I found 3 antique machines on craigslist in the last 2 days, $20 each.

    sigh!
    Oh my...another one got the VSMS Fever. lol. Welcome Quiltmouse. Pull up a stool and we would love to see your 403. It's so wonderful that you have all those great memories and accessories with your vintage machine ;)
    Thanks, Judy. Really simple. I just use something called Goop & clean cottonballs. This machine was really clean to begin with, so it didnt take much!

    Happy Treadler ~ what a wonderful job you did with the Universal. She looks almost new....are you interested in coming to Ohio and helping me clean a few <grin>

    Judy

  5. #12730
    Member Cindy Lou Who's Avatar
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    quote=BoJangles]
    .....I was treadling away a few nights ago while my husband and girl friend watched TV. They didn't seem to notice anything either other than the sewing machine stitching away. Nancy[/quote]

    Quote Originally Posted by Miz Johnny
    [Well, my--aren't we liberal!! (Sorry, couldn't stop myself.)
    LOL - I was thinking the very same thing and then I got to your post and read it! Those kind of things happen to me when my fingers or mouth are faster than my brain - gets me every time!
    Cindy

  6. #12731
    Senior Member quilter711's Avatar
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    [quote=
    Photo Update 1930 White Rotary: Here is a photo of the cabinet. [/quote]

    What a beautiful cabinet :!: Great find :thumbup:

    Enjoy & Happy Quilting,
    Nancy

  7. #12732
    Super Member Jennifer22206's Avatar
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    cross your fingers for me.. I just bid on a Singer 66-8 on Ebay.. auction ends in 35 minutes and I'm high bidder.. I really really want it.

  8. #12733
    nett2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossstitcher
    Geez all the new machines everyone has gotten are fantastic, congratulations to all.


    Yesterday was Hubby's b-day so he bought this little jem on e-bay. He oiled her up and cleaned her and now I am piecing a quilt with her.
    That's like the one I got yesterday except mine is the 301A and I love it.

  9. #12734

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    Could you please please tell me how to connect to Billies tutorial on cleaning and pulling apart the machine thank you in antisipation
    Elsie
    Australia

  10. #12735
    Senior Member quilter711's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elsie Blight
    Could you please please tell me how to connect to Billies tutorial on cleaning and pulling apart the machine thank you in antisipation
    Elsie
    Australia
    Elsie, click on search at the top of the page, type in "cleaning vintage". You will find under tutorials, 3 seperate tutorials by Lostn51. You will have one beautiful machine after you are finished! Good luck!

    Nancy

  11. #12736
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olebat
    Quote Originally Posted by kwendt

    Hi olebat.... if someone hasn't mentioned it. Billy has a tutorial on how to clean these old gals. He uses kerosene and the cleaner GoJo the NON-PUMICE kind. His tutorial is really good. There's one on dismantling and one on cleaning....
    Thanks, I've seen the cabinet and guts cleaning, didn't recall the machine exterior. I'll have to wait a spell. I've hauled it in the house now. Will have to take it back outside if I use the kerosene. We're in the height of pine pollen season. The yellow dust clouds bellow everywhere. Just walking across the porch leaves footprints like walking on fresh snow. The pine pollen is large molecule, and even feels gritty. Wouldn't want that to become an abrasive. LOL
    I recall pine pollen season very well! I used to live in Beaufort,SC and my red car looked orange that time of year.

  12. #12737
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Treadler
    Although I am the Happy Treadler, I also do love any and all vintage machines. My SIL's dad called me last week to say he's got an old machine that he would really like to give me, and that if I don't take it will go to the curb. Of course I couldn't let that happen, so we had a rendezvous at the bus stop to meet (no, I didn't tell DH I was getting yet ANOTHER machine, allbeit free).

    This is a picture of the machine, and I have to say I SO fell in love with it! I LOVE the color, LOVE the vertical bobbin that inserts from the FRONT (unlike the other vertical bobbins that go in on the side), and even though my intentions were to pass this one along, I have to say she's now home where she belongs. I really did need a machine with a "ZZ" capability & fancy stitches set up in my sewing room. She adds color to my sewing room, and is one of very few electric machines that are included in my 'herd'. She's a Japanese repo of the Singer 15 (called a Universal, and I just can't get over how well-built this machine is. AND she weighs a ton! Just needed to clean her up and give her a good drink (geez, she was so thirsty she squeaked!). Happy happy me. :)
    GREAT! I love the look of it! I was just telling hubby today how much I love the vintage machines with the look of old car dashboards, and here's one! :thumbup:

  13. #12738
    Super Member Rumbols's Avatar
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    Geez all the new machines everyone has gotten are fantastic, congratulations to all.
    Yesterday was Hubby's b-day so he bought this little jem on e-bay. He oiled her up and cleaned her and now I am piecing a quilt with her.

    Congrats and happy bd. I have a 401 coming that looks similar to yours. Enjoy.

  14. #12739
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I have a Singer 66-18 that I'd like to convert to a treadle machine, the wiring is shot. The covering on the wires is just falling off, so not using right now; too dangerous. I'm hoping I can swap the handwheel and bobbin winder from a
    donor 66 machine.

  15. #12740
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Okay, I'm about to show my ignorance. If a 1912 66 has no motor and the spoked hand wheel is large, is it likely a handcrank machine?

  16. #12741
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose
    Okay, I'm about to show my ignorance. If a 1912 66 has no motor and the spoked hand wheel is large, is it likely a handcrank machine?
    If it has screw hole below the hand wheel, it can have a hand crank attached to it. Otherwise it'll be a treadle machine.

  17. #12742
    Super Member QuiltnCowgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose
    quiltmouse, your 403 is a metal machine probably made in the 50s, so it definitely vintage. Billy indicated about 1975 as the cut off timeline when I asked about my 1974 Elna. Miss Elle doesn't know she's vintage, though my other three machines do.
    My youngest (machine) is a 1956 403...oldest a 1946 Featherweight. So not to worry, quiltmouse, you will fit in just fine here.

  18. #12743
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    This is on ebay as a 'buy it now' for $35 or bid starting at $25. It's in W VA, I think. I don't want it, but it looks like it could clean up well. When I get 'my' treadle, I want it complete and I don't want a handcrank.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #12744
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    Another newbie with VSM disease!! Is there any known cure besides acquiring more machines?? ROFLMHO!!

    While I've been sewing for more years than I care to remember it's always been on modern machines and I have a collection of those too...ranging from embroidery to coverstitch to overlocker to frame quilting but always drool over vintage machines, specially treadles.

    Around 15 or so years ago I bought a Handcrank Minerva Portable at a clearing auction for $50 and around that time my MIL passed away and the family were going to toss this cute little, single drawer table that she used as a sewing table, although I don't think that was it's original purpose as it's not really designed with much leg space. But it's cute and suits the Minerva which sits on a very old, handmade, cutwork doily.

    Having just moved to a new house with a big sewing/quilting room where all the machines will be setup all the time, I began looking on eBay for 'any old electric machine in working condition that I could convert to a felting machine' and found this little lady listed as 'Singer Sewing Machine - Black' with bids to start at 99 cents! Someone bid $1, another person went to $5 and my bid was $5.50. Arrangements were made to pickup as I live in a country area and would be visiting the city the next Saturday and I didn't even bother to open the case until the Tuesday because I wasn't expecting too much. What a surprise...looking back at me was this almost mint condition Singer 99-13 (I think) and while the top case wasn't the original (seller had already noted this) I quickly placed her on a table, turned the handwheel which was free-running, electrical connection/cable look OK, grabbed a scrap of fabric and did some stitches by hand...tension was a little off, so a slight tweak and it was perfect. Then my curiosity got the better of me and I decided to plug it in and give it a whirl!! Again, perfect stitches although a little small but I soon figured how to lengthen and this little girl runs like a swiss clock...just ticks away!! The handwheel is spoked which makes me curious if this was a handcrank originally? the electric motor is a Sew-Tric Ltd (London), the foot pedal is flat (not button style) and the extension table is hinged on both sides (a permanent fixture). It has no reverse and stitch length adjustor has no markings (just a chrome knob) serial number is Y9808840 which I found on the Singer site is a 1935 made in Clydebank, Scotland.

    Instant decision...NO way will I be using this machine for felting, so I called to the local Op Shop to see if they had any feet and a bed screw to locate the seam guide when one of the volunteers working there said she had an 'old Singer' that she was about to toss out because she was moving house and doesn't sew. Someone had given it to her a few years ago and it was working, but doesn't any longer. Called to collect it later that day, as arranged, and unfortunately it didn't have any feet/accessories but once again placed it on a table and first thing I noticed was an 'extremely' bent needle...probably 1/2" to the LHS, no wonder it wouldn't sew, the needle couldn't go through the needle plate!! Removed the needle, turned the handwheel, inspected electrical connection/cable all appeared OK, so plugged it in. Works like a charm so this will be my felter and winging it's way to me from the US is a felting adaptor and an extra packet of felting needles. It is labelled 'Capri' on the front, and a quick search indicates it's from the early 60's, a nice little machine but doesn't compare to the 99.

    I don't have photos of the Capri but will take some in a few days and post. In the meantime here are the (eBay) photos of my 99...if anyone knows more about this machine please don't hesitate to correct, or add, to the info.

    Thanks for such a great group where everyone seems to be so friendly...I started to read from the beginning but gave up after 30 pages!!



    :lol:
    Attached Images Attached Images



  20. #12745
    Senior Member melinda1962's Avatar
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    Welcome!! We all like to share how we got the VSM disease. More machines is a good answer. Can't wait to see your other pics. Enjoy reading.

    Melinda

    Quote Originally Posted by HanNatNana
    Another newbie with VSM disease!! Is there any known cure besides acquiring more machines?? ROFLMHO!!

    While I've been sewing for more years than I care to remember it's always been on modern machines and I have a collection of those too...ranging from embroidery to coverstitch to overlocker to frame quilting but always drool over vintage machines, specially treadles.

    Around 15 or so years ago I bought a Handcrank Minerva Portable at a clearing auction for $50 and around that time my MIL passed away and the family were going to toss this cute little, single drawer table that she used as a sewing table, although I don't think that was it's original purpose as it's not really designed with much leg space. But it's cute and suits the Minerva which sits on a very old, handmade, cutwork doily.

    Having just moved to a new house with a big sewing/quilting room where all the machines will be setup all the time, I began looking on eBay for 'any old electric machine in working condition that I could convert to a felting machine' and found this little lady listed as 'Singer Sewing Machine - Black' with bids to start at 99 cents! Someone bid $1, another person went to $5 and my bid was $5.50. Arrangements were made to pickup as I live in a country area and would be visiting the city the next Saturday and I didn't even bother to open the case until the Tuesday because I wasn't expecting too much. What a surprise...looking back at me was this almost mint condition Singer 99-13 (I think) and while the top case wasn't the original (seller had already noted this) I quickly placed her on a table, turned the handwheel which was free-running, electrical connection/cable look OK, grabbed a scrap of fabric and did some stitches by hand...tension was a little off, so a slight tweak and it was perfect. Then my curiosity got the better of me and I decided to plug it in and give it a whirl!! Again, perfect stitches although a little small but I soon figured how to lengthen and this little girl runs like a swiss clock...just ticks away!! The handwheel is spoked which makes me curious if this was a handcrank originally? the electric motor is a Sew-Tric Ltd (London), the foot pedal is flat (not button style) and the extension table is hinged on both sides (a permanent fixture). It has no reverse and stitch length adjustor has no markings (just a chrome knob) serial number is Y9808840 which I found on the Singer site is a 1935 made in Clydebank, Scotland.

    Instant decision...NO way will I be using this machine for felting, so I called to the local Op Shop to see if they had any feet and a bed screw to locate the seam guide when one of the volunteers working there said she had an 'old Singer' that she was about to toss out because she was moving house and doesn't sew. Someone had given it to her a few years ago and it was working, but doesn't any longer. Called to collect it later that day, as arranged, and unfortunately it didn't have any feet/accessories but once again placed it on a table and first thing I noticed was an 'extremely' bent needle...probably 1/2" to the LHS, no wonder it wouldn't sew, the needle couldn't go through the needle plate!! Removed the needle, turned the handwheel, inspected electrical connection/cable all appeared OK, so plugged it in. Works like a charm so this will be my felter and winging it's way to me from the US is a felting adaptor and an extra packet of felting needles. It is labelled 'Capri' on the front, and a quick search indicates it's from the early 60's, a nice little machine but doesn't compare to the 99.

    I don't have photos of the Capri but will take some in a few days and post. In the meantime here are the (eBay) photos of my 99...if anyone knows more about this machine please don't hesitate to correct, or add, to the info.

    Thanks for such a great group where everyone seems to be so friendly...I started to read from the beginning but gave up after 30 pages!!



    :lol:

  21. #12746
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn
    Just read all the threads on wood. First the myth buster-wood is dead so no oil in the wood. It is the moisture content that is critical. Wood should by dried to about 12-15%. This prevents warping and workable into furniture. If the wood was any wetter it would not take a finish. Furniture likes around 30% humidity to be happy and so do people so if you are comfortable so is the furniture and pianos. Guardsmen is a polish like wax and is applied to protect the finish on the wood not the wood. Since most finish are shellac or varnish so some oils like lemon oil old english when applied just sit on top of the finish and it can't get to wood thru the finish anyway. These oil make the finish look good until it evaporates and has to applied again. It is a myth you need to feed the wood with linseed oil this to will not go thru the finish to wood. Wood is dead and does not need feeding anymore. There are oil finish such as teak to keep the wood looking good and tung oil but remember these are finishes just like shellac or varnish. The idea of finished wood is to keep moisture from transfering in and out of the wood which can cause warping and rot. Of course to protect the wood from damages caused by use. I use paste wax once a year on my antiques and dust regularly with a soft cloth to bring back the shine. Also a waxed surface is slick so when objects are moved across the finish it will scratch less. We say the wood looks dry but what we are seeing is the old finish that is worn dull and flaking. So we apply oil and it looks good but this is only temp until it evaporates. We see ugly finish such as sewing machine cabinets, so we strip and under all the old finish is good sound and beautiful wood that only needs a good finish again to bring it back to life. I don't think the original owners fed the wood with oil but a 100+years later after all the old finish is gone the wood is still good. The third myth is wax build up with pledge, pedge has no wax in it to build up it it mostly oil(lemon) and perfumes to make the house smell good. Wax will not build up either because everytime to apply it it takes the old wax off. What we see as wax built up is mostly oil a dust that has collected on the finish when we dust with oil. Or the wax is applied to thickly and not buffed off to a shine. I hope this answers some of you questions without being to windy. I have nothing against polishes such as guardsmen they are to protect the finish and not the wood. So use what you prefer and what you like the looks of I just wanted everyone to know the real story. Just don't use it on unfinished wood thinking you are feeding it, remember wood is dead and needs no food. Please do not be upset with me I am very serious about restoring antique furniture and sometimes get carried away. Glenn
    Glenn this is so informative! We all need and want to learn so yeah teach us -- we love to learn the truth!

    Nancy

  22. #12747
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olebat
    New (to my home) Singer 66 for $16

    Speaking of cleaning recommendations for surface cleaning of this 66?
    Olebat, nice looking 66 -- and I bet you can get her all shinned up with a little cleaning. Billy has a cleaning tut here, just do a search.

    Nancy

  23. #12748
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmouse
    newbie pulling up a stool?

    Singer 403 Slantomatic. I have all the bits pcs cams manual, everything. A couple of fancy gadget feet that I never have fiddled with. One is supposed to be a ruffler.

    Is that too young for this club? :mrgreen:

    That Universal is just adorable.
    Quiltmouse, that 403 is definitely a vintage! You are in the right shop!

    Nancy

  24. #12749
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitzone
    Photo Update 1930 White Rotary: Here is a photo of the cabinet.
    If you have extra time check out:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/a...ession?start=0
    Judy, I love the cabinet! I didn't get the cabinet, before we got the White the previous owner had taken a sledge hammer to the cabinet!

    Nancy

  25. #12750
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Treadler
    I did clean up my Universal a bit tonight. Here's a few pics: http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/...03630418tNyDfe

    Really love all the little unique things about this machine, and I LOVE the color!
    Yes, that is a really nice looking machine! Love your webshots!

    Nancy

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