Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1784 of 1792 FirstFirst ... 784 1284 1684 1734 1774 1783 1784 1785 ... LastLast
Results 44,576 to 44,600 of 44790

Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #44576
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Lorenzo, CA
    Posts
    5,290
    I use RTV all the time and make medallions, parts, etc for folks. In our Local SCA group I cast a large portion of the local awards. It is really simple to work with. I have not tried "thermosetting plastic" (researching now...hehe) but the Pewter (also known as Silver solder) is pretty easy to work with. I use an old electric 1 cup melter (for making bullets) that the electronics died on years ago. we just set it on the gas stove to heat it up, works great.

    If I am only casting a single of something or making something in bronze (higher melting point), I use Delft clay and sandcast it.

  2. #44577
    Super Member manicmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,867
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    I have not tried "thermosetting plastic" (researching now...hehe)
    There are two basic types of plastic: thermosetting and thermoplastic. Thermosetting are set by adding another chemical to change the bonds (like araldyte). These don't melt (and can't be re-cast). Thermoplastic are usually softer and can be melted by applying heat.
    Singers: model 12 MOP (1885) Improved Family 29k58 (1939) 44K11 (1921) 201K2, 201K23 206k11 (1950) 222k (1959) 320k2(1959), 15K90, Bernina 530, Pfaff:360 (1959) http://tailororfailure.blogspot.com

  3. #44578
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,392
    Blog Entries
    2
    Grant, I ran into plastic bit parts with Necchi Nora and an old Bernina. I guess I kind of wrote those off as well as anything else plastic. The Necchi and the Bernina were foolers, everything looked so well made and so much metal. The little plastic parts were junk though.

    Steve, I never thought about casting new parts with silver solder.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  4. #44579
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Centralia, WA, USA
    Posts
    4,891
    I know it's 40 years later on many of these machines but it's still regrettable that the manufacturers chose plastic for many of these parts when they had to know metal (even low grade pot metal) would have lasted forever. The difference in cost per machine couldn't have been that much.
    The machines being made today will be even more difficult to repair 40 years from now because there will be degraded electronics along with plastic parts to deal with.
    Silver solder gets expensive quickly and melts at higher heat. It's also stronger than pewter or regular solder. Pewter doesn't have silver in it and is closer to babbitt and plumber's solder in composition.
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  5. #44580
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,076
    Of course they knew, Rodney! The whole idea was to get people to throw things out after a few years and buy new. Once that nasty idea took hold it spread like wildfire. Then when you have one big corporation owning several "competing" brands, they have no worry about losing customers.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

  6. #44581
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    madison
    Posts
    469
    Ok, dear QB members, that 'beautiful' lavendar Necchi machine is mine. I could not get it to free up and did not have the knowledge to remove the top gears and look further into the machine. I took it to Grant at Sew Restore and he has posted his results. He put alot of work into this and has it up and runing for me.

    I have no idea what you are talking about 'making a part'. can you elaborate on this. is this going to be cost effective to make per part (I have 3 with cracks in them). would this be something that once made, other parts can be made like them? would this benefit the Necchi world of vintage machines? I hear of not buying a Necchi Lola , I think, due to cracking in the cam shaft rendering the machine non-functioning. why has someone not cast one of these parts for the Necchi. this would save alot of machines. or is this not cost effective.

    Karen
    😊 wilburness 😊

  7. #44582
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Brookfield, IL
    Posts
    862
    Quote Originally Posted by wilburness View Post
    Ok, dear QB members, that 'beautiful' lavendar Necchi machine is mine. I could not get it to free up and did not have the knowledge to remove the top gears and look further into the machine. I took it to Grant at Sew Restore and he has posted his results. He put alot of work into this and has it up and runing for me.

    I have no idea what you are talking about 'making a part'. can you elaborate on this. is this going to be cost effective to make per part (I have 3 with cracks in them). would this be something that once made, other parts can be made like them? would this benefit the Necchi world of vintage machines? I hear of not buying a Necchi Lola , I think, due to cracking in the cam shaft rendering the machine non-functioning. why has someone not cast one of these parts for the Necchi. this would save alot of machines. or is this not cost effective.

    Karen
    Hi Karen. Thank you for the kind words. I have some machinist friends that might be able to machine a part out of metal that duplicates the original plastic part, but that would be expensive to do, but it would last forever. It would then have to be welded onto the original metal part of it.
    The other method is having a 3-D printer make a plastic copy. This will probably be common in the near future to make parts like this or cam stacks and other obsolete parts (I can't wait). One more method is making a cast of the part out of metal kind of how you would cast a statue. All options are expensive and time consuming at this time. The 3-D printer, once a program is made can make an endless amount of identical parts. The other methods would be more of a "one off" deal.
    ~G~

  8. #44583
    Member Wavewatcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Porter Ranch, CA
    Posts
    47
    Does anyone know if Bergmann was a manufacturer or just a retailer? Pictures of the machine will go a long way toward getting the help you need for a shuttle. There may be a Boye shuttle that will fit too.
    Rodney[/QUOTE]
    This is a picture from the GW auction site.Name:  image.jpg
Views: 329
Size:  41.1 KB

  9. #44584
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,367
    Stephanie,

    I would love to come to Mena, not just because of the Treadle On, but because I was born and raised in Arkansas. I love the area around Mena, too, but I'm not in for traveling for a while!

    Jeanette

  10. #44585
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Brookfield, IL
    Posts
    862
    I came across this today when cleaning a Singer 15-91. It must have been etched into the part at the factory because the stamping on it was light. Interesting. Has anyone else seen this before?
    ~G~

    Name:  2015-08-05 12.03.small.jpg
Views: 225
Size:  1.66 MB

  11. #44586
    Super Member jlhmnj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Millville, NJ
    Posts
    1,731
    Quote Originally Posted by Wavewatcher View Post
    Does anyone know if Bergmann was a manufacturer or just a retailer? Pictures of the machine will go a long way toward getting the help you need for a shuttle. There may be a Boye shuttle that will fit too.
    Rodney
    This is a picture from the GW auction site.Name:  image.jpg
Views: 329
Size:  41.1 KB[/QUOTE]

    Hi,

    I snipped a conversation from the Needlebar website regarding Bergmann:

    "Bergmann & Hüttemeier were in (Kjobehavn) Copenhagen, Denmark. It looks like they were more involved in distribution and final assembly. So the machine was most likely made by some other company. Though Wilhelm states they had a patent in 1872 for a glove SM. So it's hard to say what they manufactured. "

    Jon

  12. #44587
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, CA
    Posts
    3,918
    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    I came across this today when cleaning a Singer 15-91. It must have been etched into the part at the factory because the stamping on it was light. Interesting. Has anyone else seen this before?
    ~G~

    Name:  2015-08-05 12.03.small.jpg
Views: 225
Size:  1.66 MB
    That's pretty cool! I just took apart my 15 and I'm pretty sure mine wasn't hand-etched. Seems insane to think there was that level of detail going on during the building and assembling of these machines that someone would notice the light stamping and bother to hand-etch it. I doubt you'd see something like that in a modern machine.

  13. #44588
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Brookfield, IL
    Posts
    862
    Quote Originally Posted by Sewnoma View Post
    That's pretty cool! I just took apart my 15 and I'm pretty sure mine wasn't hand-etched. Seems insane to think there was that level of detail going on during the building and assembling of these machines that someone would notice the light stamping and bother to hand-etch it. I doubt you'd see something like that in a modern machine.
    I think this is a testament to the quality of these older machines. It was made in 1956 when pride and quality still mattered, and planned obsolescence was not heard of yet. Something else that is amazing to me is, that Singer stamped every part (within reason) with the part number on it and where it was made.
    Funny side note, they actually misspelled Simanco. They spelled it Sinanco.
    ~G~

  14. #44589
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    3
    Has anyone here ever heard of a Stylemaster Precison Deluxe sewing machine? I've looked everywhere online & found nothing. Maybe another company made them?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by raifordgirl; 08-08-2015 at 09:47 AM.

  15. #44590
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Centralia, WA, USA
    Posts
    4,891
    Welcome! Your machine is a Japanese made Singer 15 copy. They were made by the millions after WWII up into the 50s. The model is still being made in India and China though the quality isn't as good as the older Japanese ones. Anyone who wanted to place a minimum order could get whatever name they wanted put on the machines.
    Search for "15 Clone" here for more info.
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  16. #44591
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Firmly North Georgia
    Posts
    838
    I should be working on a Pfaff 130 tonight but the woman selling it on Craigslist turned out to be a ditz. We were on the way when she called to say not to come, someone else was interested. Translated: They offered her more money than she was advertising it for. GRRRR.
    Life is made up of bits and pieces. You won't know how it'll turn out till its done.

  17. #44592
    Junior Member Gray fox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    159

    New Home Midget

    This travel/toy machine was my playtime today, and it sews nicely! It is a lockstitch, but about the same size as a Willcox & Gibbs or the largest Muller chainstitch machines. It is surprisingly heavy, so it doesn't need to be clamped down. This one has lots of paint chips and signs of wear, but cleaned up to be quite nice.

    The patent dates are 1911 and 1912. Originally patented by the president of the Knickerbocker Hand Sewing Machine Company of New York, and some are labeled that way on the stitch plate. Apparently New Home took over, and it became "Little Worker" and eventually "Midget." Montgomery Ward offered them, now called "Mother's Helper" in the late 1920s. Information is difficult to find, so if anyone can add to this, it would be appreciated!

    These machines are quite common, but usually missing their small shuttle and bobbin.

    As always, it is such a kick to get a neglected machine sewing again!

    Dianne in Colorado
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Needle down......foot down......sew!

  18. #44593
    Super Member jlhmnj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Millville, NJ
    Posts
    1,731
    Dianne,

    Very nice, she cleaned up beautifully. Wonder who was the targeted buyer?

    Jon

  19. #44594
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Centralia, WA, USA
    Posts
    4,891
    Not THAT'S a neat machine!
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  20. #44595
    Junior Member Gray fox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    159
    Jon, I expect they marketed this little wonder to every possible likely customer - children, travelers, those who couldn't afford a big machine, people who occasionally do some mending, and whatever else they could come up with.
    I'd like to see an ad, and find out if there were accessories offered.

    Rob Sanders has an article on ISMACS about making replacement parts for sewing machines, here: http://ismacs.net/sewing_machine_art...-machines.html

    He talks of making a replacement shuttle and bobbin for these machines by cutting down a standard shuttle and bobbin.

    With a thumb screw from a New Home A and a cloth guide of unknown origin, this Midget can be set up to do piecing. One would have to refind the quarter inch with every bobbin refill, which will be pretty frequent on this machine. The cloth guide could be marked to make that easier. The machine uses 20x1 needles, like other New Home machines.....I haven't tried lowering a standard needle, but probably it would work.

    It's a fun little thing!

    Dianne in Colorado
    Needle down......foot down......sew!

  21. #44596
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central Minnesota
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by redmadder View Post
    I should be working on a Pfaff 130 tonight but the woman selling it on Craigslist turned out to be a ditz. We were on the way when she called to say not to come, someone else was interested. Translated: They offered her more money than she was advertising it for. GRRRR.
    Question. Had you offered her full price? Not that taking a higher price after agreeing to a price is ever good.

  22. #44597
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    32
    I went on a safari Friday for a FW advertised on CL. It was over an hour drive. I was supposed to call the lady when I got to the Kroger parking lot. I called 4 times, waited an hour started looking in thrift and antique shops. After the second hour I tried again. She came & met me & I followed her to her next door neighbor's house. The neighbor had passed away and she was conducting the sale for family members who lived far away. The FW had looked decent in the picture and I had already asked if there was a case or any attachments. She said no. The listed price was $75.00. When I saw it, I nearly cried. It was frozen up, and looked like it had been setting in water with the paint peeling and otherwise awful. I left and today she relisted it for $35.00 and stated that it would not run and the paint was peeling. Gaaaa!

  23. #44598
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Firmly North Georgia
    Posts
    838
    Yes, I offered her full price. Funny, fishy, smelly deal, its still listed on CR. Guess they didn't take it after all.
    Life is made up of bits and pieces. You won't know how it'll turn out till its done.

  24. #44599
    Super Member chris_quilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    leavenworth, ks
    Posts
    3,029
    Blog Entries
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Wavewatcher View Post
    Does anyone know if Bergmann was a manufacturer or just a retailer? Pictures of the machine will go a long way toward getting the help you need for a shuttle. There may be a Boye shuttle that will fit too.
    Rodney
    This is a picture from the GW auction site.Name:  image.jpg
Views: 329
Size:  41.1 KB[/QUOTE]This machine looks quite similar to my aunt's Avona handcrank machine that she displays as a "pretty". I do get to dust it and play with it when I visit her.
    I meant to behave......but there were too many other options

  25. #44600
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Lorenzo, CA
    Posts
    5,290
    Just a quick reminder to folks that the Victorian Sweatshop Collection will be at the Willits Kinetic Carnival on the weekend of Aug 22 and 23rd. Hope to see some of you folks there. We will be set up in the Mendocino County Museum

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.