Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1652 of 1792 FirstFirst ... 652 1152 1552 1602 1642 1651 1652 1653 1662 1702 1752 ... LastLast
Results 41,276 to 41,300 of 44790

Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #41276
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    30
    If it is badged does that mean it was manufactured for a store for them to put there name on?

  2. #41277
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    30
    Got the bobbin winder fixed. Didn't attach the spring In the little hole.

  3. #41278
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    30
    Thanks to skip I threaded the machine and got the tension right. Did a little test sew BG turning the hand wheel and it is so much smoother than my modern machine. Can't wait for the belt to come Wednesday so I can do some serious sewing.

  4. #41279
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    bpeace4u, It is sure fun sewing with those old ladies.

    I cleaned up a Universal today. (15 clone) I got it thinking Aha parts machine. Yeah it looked that bad. No slide plate and the bobbin case was rusted pretty good. I started by oiling the innards. It turned so nice... so I took EVERYTHING off, cleaned Tammi style with a dump bucket full of Oxyclean and soap. That mix did not take the tar off though. I used rubbing alcohol someone on here mentioned - I figured there was nothing to lose. The whole back end of that machine was covered in tar - I wondered at first if it was some kind of a textured finish on it. It did clean up and looks pretty darn good. It is probably the quietest machine I've had in a very long time. The tension was gooey with dried up oil so I re-did it last thing. Then I test sewed and it sews perfectly! I need to check the motor and wiring yet. I had a bobbin case but I need to find a slide plate. Clones are so forgiving. Then on the way home this evening my car got rear ended. We are ok but ache.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  5. #41280
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    Miriam,

    I'm gonna try the rubbing alcohol on the 15-91 I have. It also has that tarry stuff on it.

    Glad you are OK. Were you in your little red car? Perhaps you should buy a big Buick Roadmaster. More substance to it. Just kidding, pain hurts, oh how I know that.

    Joe

  6. #41281
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    Yeah it was my new Honda Fit. I'm ok just ache. The alcohol didn't faze the decals - I was surprised. I wonder how it will work on my Singer 99 with piles of the tar stuff.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  7. #41282
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    I hope the nitwit that hit you has good insurance. Both of you need fixed now.

    Well, I'm going to try it on that 15 of mine. If it cleans it up I WILL BE THRILLED. It's a good decent machine, just icky ugly because of that tar stuff. I can't even bare to sell it cos of that.

    Joe

  8. #41283
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    525
    Is Tri-Flow the same as WD-40?

  9. #41284
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Martinsville, Indiana
    Posts
    1,441
    Quote Originally Posted by frudemoo View Post
    Is Tri-Flow the same as WD-40?
    NO!!!!! Don't use the WD40 on your machine. You can order Tri-Flow from sew-classics on line.

  10. #41285
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    525
    Quote Originally Posted by Janis View Post
    NO!!!!! Don't use the WD40 on your machine.
    Thanks Jan. It's interesting, some people say to use WD-40 for certain things. I have used it to get screws unstuck, for example. Very careful not to get it near paintwork. Is that the reason for your emphasis, or is there some other reason not to use it that I should be aware of?

  11. #41286
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    WD-40 residue will gum up the works at some point. Use Tri-Flow - bicycle shops carry it and you can get it mail order. It is expensive but worth every penny. You have to remember to shake the stuff though. It will free up the tight screws. Yesterday when I was working on the clone I had stuck throat plate screws. I put a little Tri-Flow on it and kept oiling the rest of the machine. Then I tried the screws again and they turned just fine. Same on the balance wheel. It was stuck but good - T-F got it loose. It seems to cut the dried up oil just fine and does no other damage. You do not need a big bottle and you do not need spray - just get a little drip bottle.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  12. #41287
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    Does anybody know how to open the top on a Singer 6215C??? Does anybody know where to find an adjusters/service manual? I located a user's manual. No info in there - I think they were trying to keep the service guys in line. I'm thinking the machine might be ok but shouldn't the top moving thingies get oils now and again? My shop is getting cluttered up with plastic machines. People gift me with them. I figure give them a sporting chance.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  13. #41288
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    525
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    WD-40 residue will gum up the works at some point.
    Ah! I think I remember a locksmith saying something about this once. Thanks very much for clarifying, I will definitely invest in some Tri-Flo.

    Did you see my post about the CLR cleaning up the bobbin case? I was hoping someone would have had some experience with this. Especially as there may be a reason not to use it that I'm not sure about...

  14. #41289
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    I have never used it but you can bet I will be testing out CLR - I use Evap-o-rust from Harbor Freight - it wasn't very expensive. I think I've had the same can for quite a while.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  15. #41290
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    Does anybody know how to open the top on a Singer 6215C??? Does anybody know where to find an adjusters/service manual? I located a user's manual. No info in there - I think they were trying to keep the service guys in line. I'm thinking the machine might be ok but shouldn't the top moving thingies get oils now and again? My shop is getting cluttered up with plastic machines. People gift me with them. I figure give them a sporting chance.
    I looked up that model and it is similar in shape to our 4622A. To pull the top off that one you have to first remove the nose piece, one screw down towards the bottom, then under the left end of the top you have to loosen a screw that holds a sheet metal part that's attached to the underside of the top.
    Then there is one screw through the top at the left end, and two screws through the top at the right end.
    After that you have to remove the knob from the stitch length lever and then wriggle the top off.

    Now, since you can't figure it out yours might not have the screws on the top. The few pics of that model I found are so small I couldn't see what I was looking at.
    Could you post a couple close ups of the top and front?

    I can tell you that the internal parts are stamped sheet metal and plastic. There isn't much to lube on the sheet metal, but the plastic "might" have been greased in the past. I had to clean the old grease off the gears in our machine because it had become stiff and gummy. Tri-Flow grease did wonders after that.
    The shafts are steel and pass through bushings in the aluminum body. T/F helps there too.
    And under the nose piece there are many moving ZZ mechanisms you can't see well, but if you can get the T/F oil to them you'll think you just got a new machine.

    Will try to find better pix and or manuals.

    Joe

  16. #41291
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    I looked up that model and it is similar in shape to our 4622A. To pull the top off that one you have to first remove the nose piece, one screw down towards the bottom, then under the left end of the top you have to loosen a screw that holds a sheet metal part that's attached to the underside of the top.
    Then there is one screw through the top at the left end, and two screws through the top at the right end.
    After that you have to remove the knob from the stitch length lever and then wriggle the top off.

    Now, since you can't figure it out yours might not have the screws on the top. The few pics of that model I found are so small I couldn't see what I was looking at.
    Could you post a couple close ups of the top and front?

    I can tell you that the internal parts are stamped sheet metal and plastic. There isn't much to lube on the sheet metal, but the plastic "might" have been greased in the past. I had to clean the old grease off the gears in our machine because it had become stiff and gummy. Tri-Flow grease did wonders after that.
    The shafts are steel and pass through bushings in the aluminum body. T/F helps there too.
    And under the nose piece there are many moving ZZ mechanisms you can't see well, but if you can get the T/F oil to them you'll think you just got a new machine.

    Will try to find better pix and or manuals.

    Joe
    I'll try to get some pics. I got the 3 screws in the top, the nose end, front knobs and the hand wheel end off. Something is hanging up by the handle on the right - deep in the bowels of the machine. The machine seems to turn just fine but I want to grease and oil all that sheet metal and plastic gears - maybe someone can get some use out of it. It is suppose to do some nice stretch stitches.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  17. #41292
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    We paid $7.00 for our 4622A at a yard sale. It needed one part that cost about $10.00. Then it needed lubed and now it does excellent stretch stitches. No external cams, just internal ones and it's simple to use. That is the only reason it's still here and hasn't been rehomed.

    Have you removed all the little knobs at the top of the front if they pass through the top piece?

    Joe

  18. #41293
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    Yeah I pulled the little knobs off. Something is hung up by the right side handle somewhere. I'll have to look it over next time I get to the shop. I'll have to deal with the accident stuff tomorrow and work a couple hours.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  19. #41294
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    525
    Well, I had a thorough look at my Necchi Supernova Automatica machine last night and it's the first machine I've ever owned that was as dirty as a barbecue! The other machines I've come to own have seemed more clean and dry, even if they are dirty in areas and have packed in lint etc. This one is like a grease pit!! All the lint and dirt is stuck on with this brown grease.

    Anyway, I set to work in grease removal as I figured that would be the only way to remove all the unwanted dirt. It also looks like it's all built up around the moving parts so I suppose it won't work as smoothly unless it gets removed and replaced with fresh oil.

    My question is... How far should I take it? I've noticed some people talk about sitting their mechanical machines in a bucket of soapy water (and now I know why!!) but this machine has electrics underneath. Am I attempting to get all the parts back to 'shiny and new' or just 'serviceable'? ....and what should I be using to remove it?

    I hope someone out there will be patient enough to explain this stuff to me. I am SO desperate to learn how to do all of this myself, but every time I look at a new machine there are always new issues and new questions. Also the mechanics are a lot more complicated than for a simple SS machine. There is a nifty button that you're supposed to be able to turn and push down to drop the feed dogs. It's a spring loaded mechanism that is so sluggish it does absolutely nothing, plus the area around the feed dogs is all black and gunged up anyway, so it's hard to know what end the problem might be at. If I could get THAT working again, I would be as pleased as punch

  20. #41295
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by frudemoo View Post
    Well, I had a thorough look at my Necchi Supernova Automatica machine last night and it's the first machine I've ever owned that was as dirty as a barbecue! The other machines I've come to own have seemed more clean and dry, even if they are dirty in areas and have packed in lint etc. This one is like a grease pit!! All the lint and dirt is stuck on with this brown grease.

    Anyway, I set to work in grease removal as I figured that would be the only way to remove all the unwanted dirt. It also looks like it's all built up around the moving parts so I suppose it won't work as smoothly unless it gets removed and replaced with fresh oil.

    My question is... How far should I take it? I've noticed some people talk about sitting their mechanical machines in a bucket of soapy water (and now I know why!!) but this machine has electrics underneath. Am I attempting to get all the parts back to 'shiny and new' or just 'serviceable'? ....and what should I be using to remove it?

    I hope someone out there will be patient enough to explain this stuff to me. I am SO desperate to learn how to do all of this myself, but every time I look at a new machine there are always new issues and new questions. Also the mechanics are a lot more complicated than for a simple SS machine. There is a nifty button that you're supposed to be able to turn and push down to drop the feed dogs. It's a spring loaded mechanism that is so sluggish it does absolutely nothing, plus the area around the feed dogs is all black and gunged up anyway, so it's hard to know what end the problem might be at. If I could get THAT working again, I would be as pleased as punch
    I have asked myself the same question - how deep do you clean. It is almost easier when you get a really gross old machine and nothing to lose. The other day I spent a long time cleaning up on an old clone. It was really filthy - tar like stuff on the out side and some on the inside. I worked and worked to get it all off. Some things were stripped off and dumped in a bucket of soapy water. Then I still had to use chrome polish to clean up chrome. The parts that come off are for sure easier to clean. I just clean a zone then put it back and clean another zone. This one I did was such a mess I figured it was either going to clean up and work or it would be for parts.

    Then I cleaned up on a White zz - it was sort of dirty but not too bad. It actually didn't get the cleaning the 15 got. I sort of wondered if I needed to get that aggressive with the White or not. I decided not. It sews just fine. It looks fine. It could have some of the exterior oil off the moving parts but why. I think some of that oil is protective anyway.

    Then I checked on my Singer 319 which has set for way too long. It was fairly thoroughly cleaned a while back. It was gummed up when I checked it. I'm pretty sure I used Tri-flo on it... but then again maybe not. I don't really remember. Maybe it was from before I discovered the joys of T-F? Maybe something needed some more cleaning. That machine was horrible. Here is a link: http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...c-t162425.html Another thing on my never ending to do list. I would also go about cleaning it different these days... sigh. always learning.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  21. #41296
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Lorenzo, CA
    Posts
    5,307
    Quote Originally Posted by frudemoo View Post
    Thanks Jan. It's interesting, some people say to use WD-40 for certain things. I have used it to get screws unstuck, for example. Very careful not to get it near paintwork. Is that the reason for your emphasis, or is there some other reason not to use it that I should be aware of?
    This is true. WD-40 really leaves behind residue that attracts crud... I used to use it for everything. Not I only use it to clean armor. Great with a green scrubbie for removing rust.

    On sewing machines I ONLY use Tri-Flow as a lubricant.

    As to bolt freeing, I start with Kroil (NOT an lubricant, it is WD-40 on steroids without the residue) It is actually referred to in its litrature as "the oil that creeps" If that does not work I spray some PB-Blaster into a cup and then apply it with q-tips. This is available at most auto parts stores. I learned about it when I owned two 1966 barracuda's... old rusty outdoor bolts.... The last level is a heat gun (hair dryer is better) I have not had that fail yet.

  22. #41297
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Brookfield, IL
    Posts
    862
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    This is true. WD-40 really leaves behind residue that attracts crud... I used to use it for everything. Not I only use it to clean armor. Great with a green scrubbie for removing rust.

    On sewing machines I ONLY use Tri-Flow as a lubricant.

    As to bolt freeing, I start with Kroil (NOT an lubricant, it is WD-40 on steroids without the residue) It is actually referred to in its litrature as "the oil that creeps" If that does not work I spray some PB-Blaster into a cup and then apply it with q-tips. This is available at most auto parts stores. I learned about it when I owned two 1966 barracuda's... old rusty outdoor bolts.... The last level is a heat gun (hair dryer is better) I have not had that fail yet.
    Steve, I was talking to a friend yesterday about mechanical stuff and Kroil came up. How would you rate it with Tri-Flow?
    ~G~

  23. #41298
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    Where do you buy Kroil?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  24. #41299
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Lorenzo, CA
    Posts
    5,307
    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    Steve, I was talking to a friend yesterday about mechanical stuff and Kroil came up. How would you rate it with Tri-Flow?
    ~G~
    Different functions.

    Tri_Flow is a lubricant. it has a silicon base so even when it dries it leaves behind a lubricant (dry silicon)

    Kroil is a penetrating oil. it's function is to seep into cracks and crevasses and soften any existing rust and/or contaminants. It is almost anti oil.

    This stuff REALLY has a amazingly low surface tension... Take two flat plates of material. Put on one drop of other stuff (Tri-Flow, WD-40, sewing machine oil, etc) and on the other put one drop of Kroil. In a few hours you will see the Kroil one has spread out WAY more than any of the others. I buy mine from McMaster Carr http://www.mcmaster.com/

  25. #41300
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    507
    hey At the rate I've acquired treadles I'm thinking it will make more sense to just buy a whole spool of leather for belts. Does anyone have a recommendation of a place I can buy it and the staples used for them? I could use 4 or 5 belts right now as it is.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.